Category Archives: String Patterns

Head Graphene XT Extreme MPA

As you know Head has made incredible strides in terms of racquet technologies and important players using them!

The racquets I received recently  are the new Head Graphene XT Extreme MPA.  Richard Gasquet, a talented and great player to watch, has been using the “Extreme” model for several years and has been making it into the late rounds at more tournaments!

The bright yellow finish with bright red and black certainly makes a statement!  The black grip is a slight departure from the more usual white synthetic grip used on many racquets.

Head Graphene XT Extreme

Head Graphene XT Extreme

The new model incorporates the ASP technology that allows the racquet to be strung either in a 16 x 19 pattern or a 16 x 16 pattern!  One racquet two string pattern options!  Great idea, I think!

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ASP Insert

This model weighs in at 319 grams (11.25 ounces) with a swing weight of 322 (11.36 ounces) with a RDC flex of 60 (compare to 71 for the Babolat Pure Drive).

I installed a new Head string that is not polyester!  The new string is Velocity MLT, a multifilament polyamide (nylon) with about 10.2% elongation.  The string bed stiffness is a comfortable RDC 61 and DT of 38.

If you are considering a new racquet consider this one for sure!

What a Year!

 

This has been an incredible year filled with challenges, great rewards, learning, and teaching!

One of the greatest challenges is making sure that tennis players of all ages can continue to play without injury. This is especially true of younger players that subject themselves to many hours of training and tournaments.

Along with all that hitting comes the risk of arm and shoulder injuries so this year has been filled with research, design, formatting, and experimenting with various string material combinations.

I would like to thank the folks at Acelon Racquet Sports for their tremendous support of our research, and, of course, continuing trial and error! There are many suppliers of tennis string that have contributed but Acelon has stepped up with an extraordinary array of string materials, and configurations. Thank you Dan!

Ashaway Line & Twine Manufacturing has also played a major role in our string research and our commitment to minimize injuries. The Ashaway Monogut ZX has proven to be an outstanding product in fulfilling our commitment. Thank you Steve!

Our commitment to “injury free” tennis will continue as long as I do this and I appreciate the contribution of many suppliers and players. Without the honest and clear feedback of the players it would be impossible to make as much progress as we did this year.

Thank you Babolat, Dunlop, ErecaHead, Wilson, YonexKimony, and many others for your support!

2015 is going to be a very good year! We will be challenged, rewarded, taught and will teach! I am looking forward to it!

Happy New Year!

Premature String Failure Getting You Down?

Of all my clients a small percentage, maybe up to ten (10) percent, suffer from premature string failure.

If you are one of these ten (10) percent this post may shed some light on the reason(s) or at least offer some sympathy!

First, what is premature string failure?

In the case of the ten (10) percent it is “the string broke”.  Period.

Ashaway Red Rough Cross Close Up

Fail!

Players are experiencing failure in less than ten (10) hours and some in less than two (2) hours.  Unless you are a touring professional this may be too often!  I understand that so we try to accommodate your desired “cost per hour” threshold.

So, premature failure is less than ten (10) hours of playing time before breaking.

Here are some contributors to this failure…

String Gauge:   the thinner (higher number) the more quickly it will break, typically.

String Tension:  lower tensions, or SBS, String Bed Stiffness, the more the strings will move which creates friction which causes notching, which, well you know.

String Movement: See above.  There is some belief that string moving will create more top spin.

String Pattern:  the fewer number of strings the more open the pattern will be and allow more movement.

Racquet Stiffness:  a very stiff racquet (RDC 70+) will put more of the impact load on the string, significantly, leading to decreased string life.

Spin: to generate spin you must swing from low to high with plenty of force (harder) causing the strings to move more.

Training:  if you are hitting for two (2) hours in training it may be like playing several tournaments.

Mis-Hits: hitting the ball close to the racquet frame creates increased stress on the string and results in “shearing” the string.

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Shank!

As you know there are many more reasons a string may break prematurely and some of it has to do with the away the strings are installed in your racquet but that is another post.

What should you do about premature string breakage?

If your situation is chronic you should consider a more dense string pattern.  A pattern of 18 x 20 is a good pattern for increased durability.  The dense pattern does not allow the strings to move so freely.

Of course if you are currently using a very open pattern, typically fewer cross strings, in hopes of maximum top spin then you are in for frequent stringing!  I hope you enjoy the “spin”!

You may consider a hybrid format with a monofilament main string and a different cross string.  Monofilaments are typically polyester based and can be a contributor to arm pain.  Monogut ZX by Ashaway is a monofilament made using PEEK (no polyester) and makes a really good hybrid format, and does not put extra stress on the arm.

Consider using a larger diameter (lower number) string.  It makes sense that the thicker the string the longer it will take to “saw” through it.  A sacrifice in “playability may occur!

Once you determine how much per hour you are willing to spend on string we can design a string setup for you that can contribute to your tennis enjoyment and still leave some money for other things!

Respond to this post with your “cost per hour” threshold and I will respond with a possible solution.  How’s that?

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